DineAbility Upgrades to Boost Your Restaurant's Business in 2019

Trendy Upgrades to Boost Your Restaurant’s Business in 2019

Is the way you’re running your restaurant not quite cutting it? Do you work hard day in and day out, yet the accounts just don’t show the intake necessary to sustain and grow your venture? Owning a restaurant is no financial walk in the park, but don’t despair yet – there are a bunch of simple upgrades you can make to boost your restaurant’s business (and these won’t cost you a fortune in initial costs, either).

So, if you’re looking to up the stakes a little and increase your customer base – and, by extension, your sales – just keep on reading.

food-truck

 

  1. Think carefully about your pricing

Upping your prices doesn’t seem like the most obvious solution to boosting your restaurant’s business, but in fact making your prices too low can put off customers. Particularly if your restaurant is sandwiched between more high-end establishments, your menu can come off looking cheap and unworthy in comparison. If you suspect this may be the case, try experimenting with a price increase before anything else to see whether you drive customers away, or actually attract more diners than ever before.

 

  1. Start a catering side-hustle

Are you wondering what to do with all that mid-morning downtime, when the chairs are empty and your staff are left twiddling their fingers? Then you might want to consider starting a catering business out of your restaurant’s kitchen.

Making catering part of your business strategy can really build your revenue in the long-term. If your restaurant proves good at catering, you’ll be able to gain an excellent reputation around town – and hardly any advertising is as effective as word-of-mouth recommendations.

If you are planning to offer catering in the long term, you could recruit some casuals as servers to accompany the food prepared for events. In addition to this, you could buy and brand your own truck to safely transport your precious morsels – this way, you won’t be reliant on outside shipping or courier services, and will be able to provide food services for events even on short notice.

 

  1. Become a pop-up haven

People love a pop-up restaurant. Particularly if your physical storefront is slightly out-of-the-way geographically, inaugurating a pop-up restaurant in a suitable high-traffic area around town can be an excellent way to lure diners from near and afar to your home establishment.

It doesn’t take much these days to organise a pop-up store: you can simply convert a shipping container to become your mobile premises, and drop it off at a popular location that’s brimming with people keen for a tasty bite.

 

  1. Work social media

In the days of digital media, people live more online than they do in real life. That’s why it’s so important, as a business owner, to learn how to manage social platforms such as Facebook and Instagram.

However, be careful of how you manage your promotions. Some struggling restaurateurs go straight for the ‘discount’ strategy, offering their customers this and that percentage off their next meal and, in essence, advertising how desperate they are for business.

Unsurprisingly, this strategy doesn’t sell. Instead, use your social media profiles to your advantage. Delicious-looking, up-to-date photos of your menu – as well as making a habit of tweeting your daily menu on Twitter (for example: #tacofridays) – will help you attract customers who are looking for your style of décor and food offerings. If you need some guidance to start, search the most successful food establishments operating in your area, and check their social media profiles.

 

  1. Upgrade your website

It isn’t just your social media that you have to keep a handle on in the online sphere; the vast majority of customers will also want to look up and order from your restaurant online. That means that you must have a modern, enticing, streamlined website with an updated menu at the forefront, as well as an online ordering option for guests who just don’t have time to wait. Believe us: once you do this, lines will be out the door!

 

Author’s bio:

Cloe Matheson is a freelance writer living in the lovely South Island city of Dunedin, New Zealand. She has penned articles for a great number of sites and blogs and has recently collaborated with the business and career site Working in NZ. As a food lover herself, Cloe jumps at any excuse to enjoy a scrumptious meal by the bay – after a long days’ work, of course. To know more about Cloe, visit her Tumblr page.

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